Explore some fascinating museums for kids in Florence from Medieval residences to interactive science museums.

Maybe you think a museum in Florence is the last place children would want to go. But here are a few suggestions we think will be right up their street.

With all the Gothic and Renaissance art that’s packed into Florence, it’s all a bit serious. But there are some intriguing museums in Florence that make an effort to appeal to younger audiences. Museums that can be treat for the whole family.

Children’s Museum – Palazzo Vecchio

Palazzo Vecchio is definitely on the to-do list in Florence. The good news is that it can be explored in a more interactive way with tours organised by professional guides that tailor the tour for families. There are tours that cater for different ages and languages, some involving secret passages. There’s a live interpretation of the space for kids 8 and up. It’s a proper interactive tour, rather than a boring list of names and dates. You can even get to dress up in some copies of Renaissance gear.

Palazzo Vecchio, Piazza Signoria

Palazzo Davanzati

This Medieval house in Via Porta Rossa 9 has been beautifully preserved and filled with antique furniture and tools. It’s an easy visit (less than an hour) and truly enjoyable. For best results, you could a book a guide beforehand who’ll give the kids a better idea of how families lived at the time.

Museo Antica Casa Fiorentina – Via Porta Rossa, 9

Museo Galileo

This newly refurbished science museum is a favourite for families. It has an interactive video-guide that helps bring to the exhibition to life with interesting facts and stories. It will appeal to children from 6 and up. Definitely one of the top museums for kids in Florence.

Piazza dei Giudici 1, (near Piazza Signoria)

Palazzo Strozzi

Palazzo Strozzi gets top marks here. It’s one of the only museums in the city that has made a genuine effort to cater to children. There are childrens’ labels in each exhibit, and cards to help you prompt them during the show. There’s also a family kit that changes according to what’s on, children’s tours and workshops, and even a “stroller tour”.

Piazza degli Strozzi (near Piazza della Repubblica)

Museo Leonardo da Vinci

Even if you don’t visit Vinci, the home town of Leonardo, you can explore the fascinating world of his inventions in this small but well organised museum that displays and explains some of his works. Many of Da Vinci’s models have been beautifully recreated in wood and many can be handled too. It’s fun, educational and very hands-on.

Via dei Servi 66/red

La Specola Natural History Museum

Not a modern museum but one that shows the history of science. It’s a fun and eccentric place that houses a collection of preserved animals, insects, marine life, and more – collected from around the world in the 18th and 19th century. There’s also an incredible collection of wax cut-aways of the human anatomy from, though be warned smaller children may find them slightly disturbing. It’s an eclectic presentation and well worth a visit.

Via Romana, 17